Jamaica's oldest Olympian Cynthia Thompson, dead at 96

By Sports Desk March 08, 2019
Dr Cynthia Thompson. Dr Cynthia Thompson.

Dr Cynthia Thompson, Jamaica’s first female finalist in an Olympic event, has passed away at the age of 96 years old.

Thompson, who became a paediatrician following he exploits on the track, passed away at the University of the West Indies hospital on Friday.  The former sprinter was Jamaica’s oldest Olympian and was one of 10 athletes chosen to represent the country at its first-ever appearance at the Games in 1948.  The Games was the first of the post-World was era.  The Olympics had been cancelled twice because of the outbreak of World War II in Europe in 1939.

Thompson went on to finish sixth with a time of 12.6 seconds in the 100m final and made the 200m semi-finals.  The athlete had set an Olympic record in the 200m heats, which was eventually bettered by gold medalist Fanny Blankers-Koen of the Netherlands.

 

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