Seven-year-old sprint sensation hailed as next Usain Bolt

By Sports Desk February 13, 2019

A 7-year-old social media sensation is already drawing comparisons to Jamaican sprint king Usain Bolt after breaking records and leaving rivals stifling in his dust.

Rudolph Ingram, also known as Blaze, has been dubbed as the fastest kid in the world after clocking a speedy 13.48 seconds over 100m.  The mark smashed the previous best of 13.69 set in 2011. 

In two videos posted to his Instagram account, which already has over 300,000 followers, Blaze is seen destroying hapless opposition in no uncertain fashion.  According to his father, Rudolph Ingram Sr, who is an American football coach, Blaze became motivated after watching the Olympics and began training soon after the event.

“Proud To Say My Son Maybe The Fastest 7 Year Old In The World. To The Top Love All Those Hours Of Training Payed Off,” Ingram Sr. tweeted via Instagram.

Despite possessing obvious sprinting talent, however, Ingram is more interested in American football.

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  • 'Only a fool wouldn't question Bolt's times' - American legend stands by comments made about Jamaican sprint king 'Only a fool wouldn't question Bolt's times' - American legend stands by comments made about Jamaican sprint king

    United States track and field legend Carl Lewis has insisted that it would be foolish not to question the records set by recently retired Jamaican sprint king Usain Bolt but claims it was never anything personal.

    The 57-year-old Lewis, a nine-time Olympic gold medallist, sparked a firestorm in 2008 when he suggested that the spectacular feats accomplished by Bolt might have been with the aim of performance-enhancing drugs.  Lewis pointed to major reductions in the sprinter’s times over 100m an event he first competed in, in 2007.  In his youth, Bolt became the first junior sprinter to run the 200m in under twenty seconds.

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    “My thing was I didn’t accuse anyone of anything but what I said is that you have to question if someone drops that fast like that.  If you don’t then you are crazy or a fool or something, whatever I said,” Lewis said in the interview to be aired on A&T Audience Network.

    “My issue with drugs has always been the brand.  Being a sport that people think is on drugs is bad for the brand.  I didn’t trust it (Bolt’s times) so I put it out there.  People asked me, ‘What are you saying?’, I already said what I said and there is nothing to change. I stand by it,” he added.

    The 32-year-old Bolt still holds the world records for both the 100m and 200m sprints, blistering marks of 9.58 and 19.19 set in 2009 that have seemed untouchable for the past several years.

    “Of course, I questioned that.  It doesn’t mean I’m saying he is on it (drugs) but we should question it…they should question anyone that does that kind of drop.  I didn’t say anywhere that he was on it.  I said we should question it because if you don’t it’s ridiculous.”

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