SportsMax and Olympic Channel launch partnership in Caribbean

By Sports Desk March 12, 2019

The Olympic Channel and SportsMax today announced a new partnership featuring both linear and digital programming across 22 Caribbean territories in support of their objective to engage new audiences and younger generations with the Olympic Movement all year round. 

Beginning on March 12, SportsMax will broadcast over 700 hours of Olympic-related content under the “Olympic Channel” brand on its channels as well as the SportsMax and Digicel apps and websites including embedded video.

Programming will feature year-round coverage including Olympic Channel original programming and live sporting events as well as additional Olympic-related content that highlights locally relevant stories created by both parties.

“We are excited to partner with SportsMax to further grow the Olympic Channel brand within the Caribbean,” said Mark Parkman, General Manager of the IOC’s global Olympic Channel. “Our collaboration will provide viewers with even more options to discover, engage and share in the power of sport and the excitement of the Olympic Games all year round as we look ahead toward Tokyo 2020.”

Olly McIntosh, CEO of IMC and SportsMax, said “as the official Caribbean broadcast partners of the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games, SportsMax and Digicel are excited to bring our viewers closer to the Olympic movement and athletes as we build up to next year. This partnership with the Olympic Channel enables us to reach everyone, whether they’re at home or on-the-go through the SportsMax or Digicel apps for all Android or Apple users on any network.”

The agreement is complementary to the International Media Content Ltd., subsidiary of Digicel Group and parent company of SportsMax, media rights agreement with the International Olympic Committee (IOC) for the Olympic Games and Youth Olympic Games through 2020.

Territories reached through the new partnership include Anguilla, Antigua & Barbuda, Commonwealth of the Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Bermuda, British Virgin Islands, Cayman Islands, Dominica, Grenada, Guadeloupe, Cooperative Republic of Guyana, Haiti, Jamaica, Martinique, Montserrat, St Kitts & Nevis, St Lucia, St Vincent and the Grenadines, Suriname, Trinidad & Tobago and Turks and Caicos.

The new strategic distribution partnership with SportsMax complements the Olympic Channel digital platform expanding the Olympic Channel’s global linear presence to 158 countries and territories.

Through collaborations with the IOC’s rights-holding broadcast partners and National Olympic Committees, the Olympic Channel is continuing to develop localised versions leading to more personalised experiences for Olympic fans around the world.

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