Jamaica's women win 4x100m gold in Colombia

By August 02, 2018
Nastasha Morrison, Jura Levy, Jonielle Smith and Sherone Simpson celebrate winning the 4x100m gold medal at the CAC Games in Colombia on Thursday. Nastasha Morrison, Jura Levy, Jonielle Smith and Sherone Simpson celebrate winning the 4x100m gold medal at the CAC Games in Colombia on Thursday.

Jamaica’s women won the 4x100m relay on Thursday at the CAC Games in Barranquilla, Colombia.

The team of Jura Levy, Sherone Simpson, Jonielle Smith and Natasha Morrison were in control of the race from the first two legs before Smith blew the race open with a strong third leg that gave anchor Natasha Morrison a comfortable lead.

They crossed the line in 43.41 seconds well clear the Trinidad and Tobago team of Zakiyah Denoon, Semoy Hackett, Khalifta St. Fort and Reyase Thomas.

Thomas finished fast to pull her team to the silver medal in 43.61, just ahead of the Dominican Republic who won the bronze medal in 43.68s.

The win gave Jamaica it’s 11th gold medal of the Games, eight of which were won in track and field.

 

  

Leighton Levy

Leighton Levy is a journalist with 28 years’ experience covering crime, entertainment, and sports. He joined the staff at SportsMax.TV as a content editor two years ago and is enjoying the experience of developing sports content and new ideas. At SportsMax.tv he is pursuing his true passion - sports.

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