O'Dayne Richards wins CAC shot put gold, compatriot Miller takes silver

By July 30, 2018
O'Dayne Richards won Jamaica's first gold medal in athletics at the CAC Games in Colombia on Monday. O'Dayne Richards won Jamaica's first gold medal in athletics at the CAC Games in Colombia on Monday.

 O'Dayne Richards and Ashinia Miller won Jamaica's second and third medals in track and field at the CAC Games in Colombia on Monday with a 1-2 finish in the men's shot put. 

Richards, the 2015 Pan American Games champion, won gold with a new Games record of 21.02m to win by some distance over Miller's 20.19m for silver. 

Richards' second-best throw of 20.75m would also have won the competition.

By contrast, Miller won the silver medal by a single centimetre over British Virgin Islands' Eldred Henry (20.18m).

The competition was of relatively high quality as the top four throwers all broke the previous Games record of Yoder Medina whose mark of 19.63m was set way back in 2002.

Jamaica's medal count now climbs to 11, with five gold, two silver and four bronze medals.

 

 

 

Leighton Levy

Leighton Levy is a journalist with 28 years’ experience covering crime, entertainment, and sports. He joined the staff at SportsMax.TV as a content editor two years ago and is enjoying the experience of developing sports content and new ideas. At SportsMax.tv he is pursuing his true passion - sports.

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