Timo Werner singled out head coach Julian Nagelsmann after scoring twice as RB Leipzig upstaged Benfica in their Champions League opener.

Werner was the hero with a second-half brace to lead visiting Leipzig to a 2-1 win over Portuguese champions Benfica in Group G on Tuesday.

Leipzig star Werner opened the scoring in the 69th minute before doubling the lead nine minutes later at Estadio da Luz in Lisbon, where Benfica's Haris Seferovic netted a late goal.

Afterwards, Werner hailed Nagelsmann – who arrived from Bundesliga rivals Hoffenheim to replace Ralf Rangnick this season and has led Leipzig to the top of the German table after four matches.

"Nagelsmann is getting us very well-prepared before the games, he's always got a few ideas when it comes to tactics and how we can react to our opponents," Werner told DAZN. "It's worked really well in every game we've played. He sets us up, but we have to execute out on the pitch."

Werner said: "It always feels great to score twice whether it's in the league or the Champions League, but tonight I think we saw phases of a very attractive game of a football. Both teams wanted to win, but for long periods our lead was deserved so we're delighted to come away with a win.

"The way my team-mates set me up today was great. That's why I'm here - to put the finishing touches on chances. Everyone put in a great performance today.

"After opening the scoring, doubling our lead was only a matter of time. We're pleased with the win, but if we can improve our chance conversion we'll be able to decide games in our favour earlier."

Leipzig defender Willi Orban added: "Nagelsmann is making every player better because we've got a little bit more structure in our game, especially with our work on the ball. You could see that in the second half - we created a lot of good situations, engineered space and that helps someone as good as Timo Werner profit up front."

It was the perfect start to Leipzig's Champions League campaign for Nagelsmann, who reportedly attracted interest from Real Madrid and Arsenal before committing to the Bundesliga outfit.

The 32-year-old sensation, who led Hoffenheim to the Champions League during his time at the club, won his first European match in charge of Leipzig and he said: "The win feels good, because we wanted to win here at the start. The victory at the start is extremely important - especially before the exhausting weeks ahead of us."

Meanwhile, Benfica assistant Nelson Verissimo said: "The game was very even in the first half, with both teams creating dangerous chances. In the second half the team that was most effective turned out to be the happy one. We had a chance before the first goal, then we had another chance for Cervi to level and we were this close from equalising after it."

Jurgen Klopp said Napoli can win the Champions League, while the Liverpool manager backed his team to bounce back from their defeat.

Defending champions Liverpool were beaten 2-0 by hosts Napoli in a controversial Group E opener on Tuesday.

Dries Mertens converted an 82nd-minute penalty after Jose Callejon appeared to go down under minimal contact from Andy Robertson at Stadio San Paolo, where the referee's decision was ratified by a VAR check, and Fernando Llorente sealed the win.

Liverpool manager Klopp, whose side lost 1-0 to Napoli in last season's group stage, was frustrated with the penalty decision afterwards and when asked about the Champions League chances of Carlo Ancelotti's side, he said: "They can win the competition, that’s how it is.

"If you have a good plan, if you have good players, which is what they obviously have, then they can win the competition. We experienced that you don't have to be the best team in the world to win the Champions League.

"You have to be in the right moment, you need to be lucky in some situations and when there's only two guys in the room that think it's a penalty you still have to accept that's a penalty, but that's all. They can win the competition, of course."

Klopp was pressed as to whether Napoli were fresher and finished stronger than Liverpool due to Serie A starting later than the Premier League, and the German was not happy.

"Tonight, the questions are really a challenge, to be honest," Klopp said. "I think the guy from Sky Italia asked me or told me Napoli was much better than us. I didn't see that game, so I don't know exactly where he was when the game happened.

"But now you say we were tired. Who had the cramps? Who was on the ground? Liverpool players or Napoli players? After the 2-0 they looked fresher than us, after the 1-0 they looked fresher than us – that's normal. You have a boost. But there was no fresher team on the pitch. There was no physical problem apart from the normal physical problems in a game like this, which is very intense [because] both teams fight hard and all that stuff. It's not a physical problem tonight.

"We have to finish the situations off. How everybody is in life, you need positive moments and you can run forever. We didn't have really positive moments tonight. They obviously got the second air, so they could go again. That's normal, but that was not the reason."

Klopp added: "I hope it [the result] is not decisive. Give us at least a few more games to change the table. In the moment it looks like Napoli’s through, but we still will be playing. We will not stop."

Lyon head coach Sylvinho was left ruing a sluggish start in Tuesday's 1-1 Champions League draw with Zenit, suggesting his side were "stressed" early on.

Zenit opened the scoring just before half-time, when Sardar Azmoun prodded home following a clever interchange on the edge of the penalty area.

Lyon did level just after the break thanks to a Memphis Depay penalty, but it ultimately felt like a missed opportunity for the Ligue 1 side, as they dropped points at home in their Group G opener.

Sylvinho – who was taking charge of a Champions League game for the first time – believes Lyon's start to the game left them with an uphill task, even if Zenit did not break the deadlock until the 41st minute.

"We started badly, maybe because we were a bit stressed," the Brazilian told reporters. "We then pulled ourselves together and had more of the possession before conceding the goal that destabilised us.

"We could have won given the way the game went after that. I have a young team that needs support from everybody, from the fans and the coaching staff."

Lyon midfielder Lucas Tousart put the hosts' woes down to a lack of creative ingenuity.

"We conceded the goal and then in an attacking sense we weren't dangerous enough in the final third in order to be able to score," he added.

"They sat very deep and we lacked creativity and inspiration. We lacked a killer touch in certain situations."

Zenit coach Sergei Semak was convinced a draw reflected the pattern of play, though he also felt the visitors could have taken the spoils.

"I think the result is fair," he said. "Lyon did put us under pressure but a number of goalscoring opportunities from both sides were probably equal. It's a tough group and anything is possible here."

Juventus and Portugal superstar Cristiano Ronaldo opened up on the sadness he feels that his alcoholic father never saw his greatest football achievements.

Ronaldo, 34, has enjoyed a glittering trophy-laden career with club and country, while he is the recipient of five Ballon d'Or awards.

However, his father Dinis Aveiro passed away when Ronaldo was aged 20 after liver failure from excessive drinking and did not see Real Madrid's all-time leading scorer reach the zenith of his career.

"My family see, my mum, my brothers, even my old son, but my father, he didn't see nothing, and it was - he died young," Ronaldo said in an interview on ITV with Piers Morgan.

"I have to have these images to show my family. But I really don't know my father 100 per cent.

"He was a drunk person. I never spoke with him, like a normal conversation. It was hard.

"Sadness? To be the number one, and he don't see nothing, and he don't see me receive awards."

Ronaldo – a five-time Champions League winner – also admitted he has banned his mother from attending big matches for her own health.

Maria Dolores dos Santos Aveiro, 64, has collapsed on a few occasions at tense games which prompted the Juve forward to step in.

"She gets so nervous, I don't understand. She is not allowed now to watch big games," he added.

"I get friends to stay with her and she goes for walks around the house. She fainted two times in the stadium. She is nervous.

"It is impossible, I don't have a father anymore and I don't want to lose my mum, so I told her 'you will not watch semi-finals or finals anymore'."

Antoine Griezmann insisted it will take time for him to gel with Lionel Messi and Luis Suarez after Barcelona escaped with a point against Borussia Dortmund in their Champions League opener.

Barcelona held on for a 0-0 draw away to Bundesliga side Dortmund in Tuesday's Group F clash after goalkeeper Marc-Andre ter Stegen saved a second-half penalty from Marco Reus.

Star man Messi made his first appearance of the season after recovering from a calf injury – coming on as a second-half substitute – but it was a frustrating night for the LaLiga champions, whose side included Suarez and close-season arrival Griezmann.

"It's my second month since I arrived, I have to get used to it and play more with them to understand the movements of Suarez and Leo," Griezmann – a €120million signing from Atletico Madrid – acknowledged in Movistar +.

"We have not knocked on the door enough and we must improve and work at it. It is a point but Marc stopped a penalty and made other saves."

Barca head coach Valverde admitted they had Ter Stegen to thank after he made a string of fine saves - including one to deny Germany colleague Reus in the 57th minute.

"It was a difficult game in a great atmosphere," Valverde said. "We had to suffer a lot, especially after the break when we lost control and they were very dangerous.

"In the first half we dominated a bit more. We were lacking in the final third. We have to thank Marc-Andre ter Stegen for his outstanding saves.

"We know we have to improve away from home. We tried giving Messi a few minutes and Luis Suarez played from the start."

Ter Stegen added: "People know what I'm capable of. I just want to concentrate wholly on my work and perform at 100 per cent of my capabilities. Today I think I demonstrated that."

Dortmund captain Reus acknowledged his frustration at missing such a golden opportunity to defeat the Spanish giants.

He said: "Marc is a world-class keeper. My penalty was not really well-taken. Back to the training ground for that.

"Of course it does not feel good. I failed to convert a penalty and we had several other chances. One goal probably would have been enough for a win. We hardly allowed Barcelona space and showed a strong performance."

Dortmund defender Mats Hummels said the result felt like a missed opportunity, however, the German insisted there were plenty of positives to take from the performance.

"In the end we lost two points and failed to be in a better position. Nevertheless, we can be especially proud of the second half," the 30-year-old said.

Erling Haaland made a stunning start to his Champions League career on Tuesday, becoming the eighth player to net a hat-trick on their debut in Europe's elite competition.

The 19-year-old netted all three of his goals in the first half as Salzburg crushed Genk 6-2, with Haaland the third youngest player to score a treble in the Champions League.

His first goal arrived in just the second minute, as he found the bottom-right corner in confident fashion from just inside the area, Haaland then doubled the tally just past the half-hour mark when finishing off a counter.

He completed the hat-trick – remarkably his fourth of the season across all competitions – just before the interval, tucking in from close range.

As impressive as his debut Champions League hat-trick was, he was not the first to accomplish the feat. Below, we look at those who came before.

Yacine Brahimi (Porto) v BATE – September 2014

Tricky winger Brahimi made an explosive entrance to Champions League football five years ago. He punished a goalkeeper error to open his account from a tight angle, before then adding a glorious solo effort and a pinpoint free-kick.

Grafite (Wolfsburg) v CSKA Moscow – September 2009

Brazilian striker Grafite pencilled himself into the history books in 2009 with a treble against CSKA Moscow. The powerful forward finished off a counter for his first, then converting a penalty. He rounded things off late on in the 3-1 win by converting a Marcel Schaefer cross.

Vincenzo Iaquinta (Udinese) v Panathinaikos – September 2005

Udinese made an emphatic start to their first Champions League campaign in 2005, dispatching Panathinaikos 3-0. Iaquinta was vital to that, opening the scoring with a header after wasting a couple of earlier chances. He made it 2-0 in the second half when racing on to Antonio Di Natale's pass and finishing, wrapping up the win with a fierce drive.

Wayne Rooney (Manchester United) v Fenerbahce – September 2004

After joining United for a reported £24million on the back of an impressive Euro 2004, Rooney truly announced himself with a marvellous treble against Fenerbahce on his Old Trafford debut. The striker got his first 17 minutes in, emphatically converting after a Ruud van Nistelrooy pass. A fine long-range effort into the bottom-left corner followed and he then blasted home a free-kick.

Yakubu (Maccabi Haifa) v Olympiakos – September 2002

Only 19 at the time, Yakubu ran Olympiakos ragged in 2002. Having missed a 5-2 defeat to Man United through suspension, Yakubu made up for lost time on matchday two, opening the scoring with a penalty. He doubled the lead against the run of play with a smart finish after holding off a defender and later added the third after getting in behind the visitors' defence.

Tino Asprilla (Newcastle United) v Barcelona– September 1997

A vibrant, colourful character, Colombian forward Asprilla produced a performance to match against Barcelona in a 3-2 win. He opened his account with a penalty, before twice nodding in towering headers from right-wing crosses, securing a famous result for the Magpies.

Marco van Basten (AC Milan) v Goteborg – November 1992

Synonymous with the spectacular, Van Basten's first goal in the revamped Champions League – having been the European Cup before the 1992-93 season – was a lovely one, finding the top-left corner despite being off-balance. A penalty followed and then came an outrageous overhead kick from the edge of the box. The Dutchman got a fourth by rounding the goalkeeper, sealing an easy win.

Frank Lampard confirmed Ross Barkley is Chelsea's designated penalty taker after the England international missed a late spot-kick in a 1-0 loss to Valencia in the Champions League.

Lampard became the first Chelsea boss to lose his maiden Champions League match in charge, as Rodrigo Moreno's second-half goal earned Albert Celades a first win as Valencia coach.

Chelsea were handed a reprieve at Stamford Bridge when referee Cuneyt Cakir used VAR to deem Daniel Wass had purposefully handled Fikayo Tomori's header on Tuesday.

Substitute Barkley pulled rank over Willian and Jorginho, who appeared to be debating with the former Everton man, to take the penalty, only to send his effort over off the crossbar.

But Lampard affirmed Barkley – who took Chelsea's penalties throughout pre-season – is indeed the club's first-choice from 12 yards.

"Ross is the penalty taker. He was in pre-season and he scored a couple and he was when he came on," Lampard told a news conference.

"He has been when he started, was when he came on today and he missed it. That is the clear story.

"I don't know what the conversation was [between them]. Jorginho and Willian were the takers on the pitch but once Ross comes on, it's his and he missed it."

Lampard's side had control for much of the Group H opener, though Chelsea's defensive frailties were exposed when Rodrigo prodded in Dani Parejo's free-kick.

Chelsea's head coach, however, believes last season's Europa League champions would have been worthy winners.

"Probably a win, at least a draw. We created enough, good chances," Lampard, whose side will also face Ajax and Lille in Group H, said. 

"We concede with one shot on target. A game we played pretty well in and lost. For sure, losing at home first game makes it tough.

"In context, it's one game done and it's still a group that I think teams will take points off each other because all the teams are strong and will fancy themselves. There is certainly no reason to be too downbeat now, but we need to win games."

The victory comes as a timely one for Valencia, whose off-field issues culminated in the sacking of Marcelino last week, a move unpopular with the squad.

Marcelino's successor Celades, however, is not aiming to change the style of play too much, as long as the system works.

"I don't have that ego, I want to do my job and have no regrets and do my best," he told a news conference.

"We don't have a lot of time to train. We didn't want to lose too much of the good things. I have respect for everyone, but I want to talk about football.

"We have to focus on the future, it's a hard-fought win and a difficult one. Playing in the Champions League is something the players earned and they showed a lot of commitment and we have to be proud."

Cesar Azpilicueta has full confidence in Ross Barkley despite his late penalty miss in Chelsea's 1-0 Champions League defeat to Valencia.

Rodrigo Moreno's goal looked set to be cancelled out when the referee awarded Frank Lampard's Chelsea a penalty following a VAR check on Daniel Wass' handball. 

Barkley, who had only been on the pitch for seven minutes, stepped up for the spot-kick, taking rank over Chelsea team-mates Jorginho, Willian and Olivier Giroud in London on Tuesday.

Willian and Jorginho, in particular, were speaking with Barkley before he took the penalty, which clipped the crossbar on its way over in the Group H opener.

But Chelsea captain Azpilicueta insisted his team-mates were simply encouraging Barkley, not debating over who should take responsibility.

"Ross is one of the best penalty takers in the team, he's one of the players that take them," Azpilicueta said.

"He had the confidence to shoot, he has taken a few penalties which he has scored.

"We had more players with great capabilities from penalties but he had good confidence to shoot, he was unlucky to hit the bar and obviously he is disappointed to not get the goal to at least get a point.

"They were encouraging [him] to have the confidence to score, he had high expectation and high confidence to score, so we tried to give him the best conditions because we knew it would be decisive, sometimes it happens. We are lucky we have a lot of penalty takers."

Mason Mount's early injury added further frustration to a disappointing night for Chelsea, with the midfielder likely facing a race against time to be fit to feature against Liverpool – who were beaten 2-0 by Napoli – in the Premier League on Sunday.

Azpilicueta, however, firmly believes in the project Lampard – who is yet to secure his first home win as Chelsea head coach – is trying to implement at Stamford Bridge, despite a lack of experience within the Blues' ranks.

"We are trying to build something special, we know we have a young squad, young players coming through and experienced players in the team to try and create something for the future," Azpilicueta added.

"We are Chelsea, we also need to win and win every game every few days we play. When we don't win we get frustrated, disappointed and it's a lesson we have to learn as a team."

Jurgen Klopp felt the spot-kick awarded against Liverpool in a 2-0 Champions League loss away to to Napoli was "clear and obvious no penalty".

Jose Callejon went down under a challenge from Andy Robertson at Stadio San Paolo on Tuesday, with referee Felix Brych pointing to the spot in the Group E opener.

Replays appeared to indicate contact between Callejon and Robertson was minimal but the decision to give the penalty was ratified by a VAR check.

Dries Mertens squeezed his penalty past Adrian and, after Virgil van Dijk's lapse, Fernando Llorente's first Napoli goal claimed all three points.

Klopp's side lost at Napoli in the group stage a year ago, going on to win the tournament, and the Liverpool manager disagreed with the vital refereeing call.

"I don't think it's a penalty," Klopp told BT Sport. "What can I say, for me, it is clear and obvious no penalty. He [Callejon] jumps before any contact, we can't change that.

"We played a lot of good football but didn't finish it off. We controlled moments but had not enough chances in the end.

"We made decisions that were not right and have to accept the result. It was very often the final ball that was not right."

Liverpool are the first Champions League holders to lose the first game of their title defence since AC Milan did so in 1994-95.

"It should hurt because there were opportunities for us," Klopp said.

"It was an open game with a lot of counter-attacks, but we didn't finish them off and that is a problem.

"In the second half it was a wild game, they were running and we were running."

Dries Mertens told Napoli they must back up their 2-0 victory over Liverpool in Tuesday's Champions League opener.

For the second season in a row Jurgen Klopp's Reds were beaten at the Stadio San Paolo without scoring a goal.

But last time out the Partenopei failed to qualify from the group stage despite having earned a 1-0 home victory over Liverpool, who went on to win the tournament.

Mertens' penalty gave Napoli a late lead and Virgil van Dijk's rare error ensured former Tottenham striker Fernando Llorente could add a second to settle matters.

"We gave everything and ran so hard," the Belgium forward told Sky Sport Italia. 

"When you take three points at the end of a game like that, it all feels good.

"It doesn't mean anything to beat the Champions League holders unless we keep going.

"We saw [Group E rivals] Salzburg beat Genk 6-2, they are also a strong team so we have to do well in the next game too.

"Last season we also did well and beat them 1-0 here. I think we prepared well as we knew what we had to do. We didn't have enough of the ball in the first half but we gave our all.

"We lost last season at Salzburg in the Europa League so will not take them for granted. We also have Lecce this weekend and saw that they just beat Torino."

Liverpool captain Jordan Henderson accepts his team must cut out errors at the back, having kept only one clean sheet in eight competitive games this term.

"In the first half I felt we played some good stuff," he told BT Sport. 

"We were just missing that final bit. Napoli are a good side and you have to defend as a team which I felt we did.

"The mistakes for the goal we need to improve on. Overall we can be better, we take responsibility and try and react the right way."

Teenager Erling Haaland announced himself on the European stage with a stunning first-half Champions League hat-trick as Salzburg thrashed Genk 6-2.

The 19-year-old, son of ex-Manchester City and Leeds United defender Alf-Inge Haaland, became only the eighth player to score three times on debut in Europe's elite competition.

Hwang Hee-chan, Dominik Szoboszlai and Andreas Ulmer were also on target for the Austrian champions as they moved top of Group E.

Norway international Haaland, who had already scored 14 times domestically heading into the match, took just two minutes to open his Champions League account when he fired low into the left corner from inside the box.

He soon doubled their advantage when a quickfire counter-attack ended with the teenager being sent clean through and he made no mistake, tucking confidently inside the right post.

A poor Genk clearance was then punished as Hwang steered a shot low inside the right post after being fed by Zlatko Junuzovic. 

Genk gave themselves a glimmer of hope five minutes before the interval courtesy of a sliding finish from Colombia defender Jhon Lucumi after Salzburg had failed to deal with a set-piece.

However, two quickfire Salzburg goals - the first a close-range finish from Haaland to complete his hat-trick before Dominik Szoboszlai converted Takumi Minamino's cross - ensured the contest was over before the break.

Haaland became the first teenager to score more than once on his Champions League debut since Wayne Rooney's hat-trick for Manchester United against Fenerbahce in September 2004.

Mbwana Samatta's header pulled one back for the visitors, yet Ulmer restored the four-goal advantage midway through the second half with a tidy finish after good work again from Junuzovic.

Samatta was initially shown a red card for a challenge on Junuzovic only for the decision to be overtuned by VAR.

What does it mean? 

Despite this being a hugely impressive result for Salzburg, they still face an uphill struggle to qualify from a group also including European champions Liverpool and Napoli. This result shows they will be no pushovers, however, and could be capable of causing an upset, particularly at home.

Haaland heroics won't go unnoticed 

Any hope Salzburg had of keeping their prized asset under wraps is certainly gone now. Haaland well and truly announced himself on the European stage with a devastating display in front of goal that is sure to have caught the eye of the continent's big guns.

Wooden spoon awaits Genk

Given the other sides in the group, bottom spot surely awaits Genk. The gulf in class between them and Salzburg means a tortuous campaign is likely to lie ahead for the Belgian side. 

What's next? 

A trip to Anfield awaits Salzburg on Champions League matchday two on October 2. Things could get interesting if they earn a result on Merseyside. Genk, meanwhile, face a Napoli side buoyed by that win over Liverpool.

Antonio Conte shouldered the blame for Inter's 1-1 draw against Slavia Prague as their Champions League campaign got off to a slow start. 

The hosts needed an injury-time equaliser from Nicolo Barella just to earn on a point on Tuesday, with Peter Olayinka having given the Czech side a deserved lead.

With Group F also containing Barcelona and Borussia Dortmund, the result represents a missed opportunity for Inter and Conte could offer no excuses.

"Slavia Prague certainly played in a very European way, aggressive and with intensity," the Inter coach told Sky Sport Italia.

"We didn't do well to find solutions and get around that. In other games, we were up against sides who sat back and waited for us, whereas Slavia attacked us. We struggled and to be honest I am not satisfied with the performance.

"I must be the first to take responsibility, because evidently I didn't have the effect I wanted in my initial choices or in explaining the kind of match we were going into.

"We could've done far better, this is not the kind of football we are training to play. We've got to improve in terms of character too, but when I talk about a growth process, it goes through games like this too, as I know what kind of situation this is."

The nature of the performance was a concern to Conte, who suggested his side had plenty of room for growth, but warned fans not to expect instant results.

"Slavia beat us in terms of intensity, determination, pace," said the former Chelsea boss. "We showed nothing of our ideas of football. You seem to think I arrive here, touch and the ducklings turn into swans.

"There's a lot of work to do and we need to improve, but that was not our football. When I say we shouldn't let ourselves get swept up in enthusiasm, I mean it. I am here to help these lads improve, so put the blame on me.

"I refuse to talk about individuals, because we were all below par, starting from me. I am the first onto the naughty step, the main dunce.

"I generally hate the long ball and run routine, as that is not our football, but that's what we largely did. It wasn't the plan."

Ross Barkley missed a late penalty as Chelsea's Champions League campaign under Frank Lampard began with a 1-0 loss to Valencia in Group H.

Valencia's off-the-field issues have overshadowed their on-field exploits since Marcelino's sacking last week, but Albert Celades' side bounced back from their 5-2 defeat to Barcelona with a resilient performance at Stamford Bridge.

With Jasper Cillessen in fine form and Mason Mount's injury having compounded Chelsea's frustrations, the Blues' frailties were exposed once more when Rodrigo Moreno prodded in Dani Parejo's free-kick with16 minutes remaining.

VAR came to Chelsea's rescue when the referee decided to award the hosts a spot-kick for a Daniel Wass handball, but substitute Barkley - who overruled Willian to take the penalty - struck the bar.

Fresh from his hat-trick against Wolves, Tammy Abraham should have done better in the sixth minute when he latched onto Cesar Azpilicueta's cross - Cillessen making the save.

Chelsea were dealt a blow soon after, Mount's Champions League debut cut short as he failed to overcome an ankle injury inflicted by Francis Coquelin's robust challenge.

Willian's volley drew a brilliant stop out of Cillessen on the stroke of half-time and Valencia's goalkeeper had more work to do when he kept out Marcos Alonso's free-kick.

But just after Lampard had gambled in throwing on Olivier Giroud for Kurt Zouma, Valencia struck.

Having stole a march on his markers, Rodrigo just managed to make enough contact on Parejo's superb pass.

Chelsea's forutnes looked to have turned with four minutes remaining when referee Cuneyt Cakir handed them a lifeline having looked at the touch-line screen, but Barkley failed to keep his composure.


What does it mean? Injuries Mount up for Lampard

To add injury to insult, Lampard - who was already without Antonio Rudiger, Emerson and N'Golo Kante heading into Tuesday's match - could now be missing influential midfielder Mount for Liverpool's trip to Stamford Bridge on Sunday.

Rodrigo comes alive when it matters

Valencia's front two had hardly tested Kepa Arrizabalaga prior to Rodrigo's chance, but the Spain international made no mistake with a clinical finish.

Barkley's confidence misplaced

Barkley had only been on the pitch seven minutes when he stepped up to take the spot-kick, even though Willian seemed to want it, and there is sure to be an inquest in the Chelsea dressing room as to why the substitute pulled rank after a dismal attempt.

What's next?

The big games come thick and fast for Chelsea, with Premier League leaders Liverpool coming up, while Valencia face Leganes in LaLiga.

Timo Werner struck twice to give RB Leipzig a deserved 2-1 victory over Benfica in their Champions League Group G opener on Tuesday.

Germany international Werner took his tally to seven goals in six games in all competitions this season with two clinical finishes inside nine second-half minutes at the Estadio da Luz.

Werner opened the scoring with a low arrowed shot and then tapped home from close range with 12 minutes remaining.

Benfica provided some late drama when Haris Seferovic scored in the 84th minute, but Leipzig held on for a win that puts them top of the pile after Zenit and Lyon drew.

Dries Mertens and Fernando Llorente struck late to earn Napoli a 2-0 win at home to holders Liverpool in the first game of the Reds' Champions League defence.

Carlo Ancelotti's men won the corresponding fixture last term with Mertens' spot-kick and Llorente's injury-time goal enough to ensure history was repeated in the Group C clash at the Stadio San Paolo on Tuesday.

Andy Robertson was deemed to have tripped Jose Callejon in the box and, after VAR ratified the penalty decision, Mertens squeezed his penalty past Adrian in the 82nd minute.

Liverpool rode their luck in reaching the knockout rounds in 2018-19 and Jurgen Klopp's men will again have to bounce back from an away loss to Napoli this year after Llorente's first goal for the club sealed all three points.

Napoli had an early strike ruled out for offside when Hirving Lozano headed home the rebound after Adrian's excellent double save from Fabian Ruiz.

Sadio Mane's shot was saved by Alex Meret in the 20th minute - Liverpool recording their first shot on target in the game having failed to manage any in last season's visit.

And the Reds should have gone into the break 1-0 up, Firmino heading wide a fine James Milner cross on the Brazil forward's 200th Liverpool appearance.

Napoli had the first big chance of the second half, Adrian showing superb reactions to prevent Mertens from turning in Fabian's deep cross, then Mane overhit a pass to Mohamed Salah as Liverpool broke at speed.

Liverpool were starting to build pressure and, after successive errors from Kalidou Koulibaly and Kostas Manolas handed him a sight of goal in the 65th minute, Salah's drive was turned around the post by Meret.

Napoli's goalkeeper had to deny Mane again as Liverpool looked to finish strongly, but when Callejon jinked into the box he went over Robertson's outstretched leg to win a penalty.

Mertens had to wait for the VAR check, but calmly drilled his strike past Adrian, with Virgil van Dijk's terrible error in stoppage time ensuring former Tottenham striker Llorente could ease home a second.

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