Third-place spots for Megan Tapper, Keshorn Walcott at ISTAF Berlin World Challenge meet

By September 04, 2022

Megan Tapper, the Tokyo Olympics bronze medallist and 2012 Olympic champion Keshorn Walcott produced podium-worthy performances at the 2022 ISTAF Berlin meet on Sunday.

Tapper, who ran a new lifetime best of 12.51 in Brussels last Thursday, ran 12.66 to finish third in the 100m hurdles race won by Commonwealth and World Champion Tobi Amusan in 12.45.

Tia Jones, who was second in Brussels in a lifetime best of 12.38, clocked 12.58 for the runner-up spot.

In the field, Walcott, the 2016 Olympic bronze medallist, was also third in the men’s javelin. The Trinidadian threw a modest 79.78m, a mark bettered by Japan’s Roderick Genki Dean (80.69m) and the winner, Germany’s Julian Weber.

Leighton Levy

Leighton Levy is a journalist with 28 years’ experience covering crime, entertainment, and sports. He joined the staff at SportsMax.TV as a content editor two years ago and is enjoying the experience of developing sports content and new ideas. At SportsMax.tv he is pursuing his true passion - sports.

Related items

  • Olympic dream in jeopardy, attorneys to file urgent appeal for hammer thrower Nayoka Clunis Olympic dream in jeopardy, attorneys to file urgent appeal for hammer thrower Nayoka Clunis

    Attorneys representing Jamaica’s hammer thrower Nayoka Clunis are set to file an urgent appeal before the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) ad hoc committee if the uncertainty surrounding her participation in the 2024 Olympic Games remains unresolved by 5 pm today, Wednesday, July 16.

    Despite achieving a National Record of 71.83 metres in May, ranking her in the top 32 in the world this year, Clunis's dream of competing on the world’s biggest stage is now hanging in the balance due to a blunder from the Jamaica Athletics Administrative Association (JAAA).

    The 28-year-old, who placed second at the JAAA National Senior Championships, initially believed she was on her way to the Olympics. However, her excitement turned to dismay when she learned that her name was omitted from the JAAA’s official list submitted to World Athletics.

    “Following the Jamaican Olympic Trials, I was elated to receive notification of my official selection to Team Jamaica. Unfortunately, I have since found myself in a difficult position. Due to an omission made by the Jamaican Athletics Administration Association, my name was not officially submitted to World Athletics. As such, I do not have a position in the Olympic Games,” Clunis shared in a post on X, formerly Twitter.

    However, after no word forthcoming from the JAAA, attorneys representing the frustrated athlete - Dr. Emir Crowne and local attorney Sayeed Bernard – have written to the JAAA informing of their intended action.

    "Mr. Bernard and I act for Ms. Nayoka Clunis, an athlete who should be well-known to you by now. As is also common ground, the JAAA’s admitted negligence (gross negligence, in some jurisdictions) has put Ms. Clunis’ Olympic dreams in jeopardy. In the absence of any updates as to Ms. Clunis’ situation by 5 p.m. today, we have been instructed to file an emergency appeal to the CAS’s ad hoc division."

    The letter continued, "Indeed, we are hopeful that an appeal to the CAS is not necessary, but the JAAA’s negligence and radio silence since July 7th has left our client with few options, not to mention the irreparable damage this has done to the mental and emotional well-being. Athletes deserve better."

    While Clunis awaits a resolution, her plight underscores the importance of strong administrative leadership, as the oversight by the JAAA could potentially rob an athlete who has shown remarkable dedication in her sport of the opportunity to achieve her dream on the global stage.

     

     

  • Jamaica tops inaugural Ice Hockey Challenger Series Jamaica tops inaugural Ice Hockey Challenger Series

    Jamaica’s Ice Hockey team emerged victorious in the final match of the Challenger Series after beating a very strong Lebanon team 12-8 at the College Ice Arena in Toronto on Saturday evening.

    In a pulsating match played before hundreds of cheering supporters, Jamaica took the early lead in the first period but fell behind after Lebanon scored three unanswered goals over the next 15 minutes of the first period. During the second of three 20-minute periods, Jamaica regrouped and fought back to take a 6-4 lead, before Lebanon pulled level at 6-6.

    Buoyed by the enthusiastic support from the massive crowd, Jamaica asserted their authority on the contest to end the period at 9–6. With victory in sight at the start of the third and final period, the Jamaicans applied pressure on their Lebanese counterparts and extended their lead to 11-7 with four minutes left in the game.

    Tight defensive work then ensured Jamaica added to their tally, though they also conceded another goal in the latter stages of the encounter. Reggie Millette and Givani Smith both scored a brace, while Maleek McGowan, Captain Taos Jordan, Amari Sellers, Tyler Drummond, Dante Sheriff, Avery Grant, Josh Mitton, and Marquis Grant-Mentis got the others.

    The Challenger Series is a new tournament involving Puerto Rico, Lebanon, and Jamaica, who are all associate members of the International Ice Hockey Federation (IIHF).

    The Challenger Series began in Chicago in April, continued in New York in June, and culminated in Toronto on Saturday.  At the end of the second leg in New York, Jamaica was in pole position and, as such, earned the automatic right to the final by virtue of the accumulation of points over the first two legs.

    Lebanon defeated Puerto Rico 9-3 in the playoff for a spot in the final.

    Across the three legs, Jamaica won six of their nine matches and now has an overall tally of 22 matches since it started to play competitively in 2019. Their record currently stands at 16 wins and six losses, with over 100 goals to their tally.

    Don Anderson, president of the Jamaica Olympic Ice Hockey Federation (JOIHF), said the Federation is now setting its sights on establishing an ice rink in Jamaica as well as building a strong local program that will facilitate the team playing in qualifying tournaments for the Olympics. He added that expert opinion is that this team could be highly ranked globally if it had the opportunity to play at the next level amongst countries with Ice Rinks.

  • Trinidad and Tobago's storied Olympic journey and prospects for Paris 2024 Trinidad and Tobago's storied Olympic journey and prospects for Paris 2024

    Trinidad and Tobago's Olympic history is rich with moments of triumph and perseverance. The journey began in 1946 when the twin-island nation formed a committee, eventually gaining full recognition from the International Olympic Committee (IOC). Since then, Trinidad and Tobago have competed in every Summer Olympic Games, making their mark on the global stage.

    The first notable participation came in 1948 when Rodney Wilkes won the nation’s first Olympic medal, a silver in the men’s featherweight division in weightlifting at the London Olympics. Wilkes continued his success by securing a bronze medal at the 1952 Helsinki Olympics. Trinidad and Tobago's first gold medal came in 1976 when Haseley Crawford won the men’s 100m in track and field athletics at the Montreal Summer Olympic Games. This historic victory was a monumental achievement, putting Trinidad and Tobago on the map in the athletics world.

    Ato Boldon stands out as one of Trinidad and Tobago's most decorated Olympians, having won four medals in his illustrious career. Boldon claimed bronze in both the 100m and 200m at the 1996 Atlanta Olympics and followed up with a silver in the 100m and another bronze in the 200m at the 2000 Sydney Olympics. His achievements cemented his status as a track and field legend for the nation.

    In more recent history, Keshorn Walcott brought home gold in javelin at the 2012 London Olympics, adding to the country's illustrious track and field legacy. Walcott continued to shine by winning a bronze medal in the 2016 Rio Olympics, and now, he aims for a third Olympic medal in Paris. Additionally, the nation received a gold medal in the 2008 men’s 4x100 relay after Jamaica was disqualified due to a doping violation by Nesta Carter.

    As Trinidad and Tobago prepare for the 2024 Paris Olympic Games, the nation has much to look forward to. Securing spots in the 4x100m and men's 4x400m relay teams at the World Athletics Relay Championship in Nassau, Bahamas, on May 5, 2024, highlights their continued strength in athletics.

    The Trinidad and Tobago Olympic Committee has announced a team of 17 athletes, including seven women and 10 men, who will compete in athletics, cycling, and swimming. Among the notable athletes is Michelle-Lee Ahye, a seasoned sprinter known for her speed and competitive spirit. Jereem Richards, another formidable contender over 200m and 400m, will join her on the track. In the pool, Dylan Carter is an accomplished swimmer with a history of strong performances. Keshorn Walcott, the Olympic gold and bronze medalist in javelin, is looking to add a third Olympic medal to his collection. Nicholas Paul, a world-class cyclist participating in his second Olympic Games, will be joined by fellow cyclist Kwesi Browne, adding depth to the team’s cycling prospects.

    The team will be supported by a dedicated group of officials and coaches, including manager Dexter Voisin, Chef De Mission Lovie Santana-Duke, Chief Medical Officer Rudranath Ramsawak, and Olympic medalist Keston Bledman.

    With a total of 19 Olympic medals—15 in track and field, three in weightlifting, and one in swimming—Trinidad and Tobago have a proud history of Olympic success. The 2024 Paris Games represent another opportunity for the nation to showcase its athletic prowess and continue its legacy of excellence on the world stage.

     

     

     

     

© 2023 SportsMaxTV All Rights Reserved.